FAQs

 

How do I get a 911 address?
How do I get my road maintained?
What is a parcel number?
When is my split going to be done and what is a deed number?

How do I find my property in Apache County under GIS/Mapping?
Need signage on County Roads
What is a Special Flood Hazard Area (Flood Plain)?
What are the different Zones in a Flood Hazard Area, and What do they Mean?

What do I do if I find my property is covered by or has a Flood Plain on it?
Can I build a home within the Flood Plain?
What is an Elevation Certificate?

How do I find if I have Access to my Property?
What is a Public Easement or Right of Way?
What is a Private Easement or Right of Way?
Do you address on the Navajo Nation?

 

How do I get a 911 address?
Complete a 911 application form found under the Engineering website. (Apache County Arizona main page, Engineering Dept., applications, 911 address application). You will need your parcel ID number of the property, must have an established driveway or a drawing of your parcel and an “X” where your driveway is going to be, plans on living on the property/or building (we DO NOT address vacant land). You can email, fax or mail application to the Engineering office. After an address is assigned you will receive a text or call with your 911 address.

How do I get my road maintained?
First it must be decided if the road is county maintained. “N” roads are “nonmaintained” by the county. Call the road yard for your area or Engineers office and they can put a work order for your request. SJ 928-337-4903 RV 928-333-4149 Chambers 928-688-2745 Dist. II 928-755-3881 Dist. I 928-674-5665 Engineering 928-337-7528

What is a parcel number?
APN Assessor’s Parcel Number is assigned to parcels of real property by the tax assessor of a particular jurisdiction for purposes of identification. (Example 123-45-678) and possible letter after if property has been split or combined previously.

When is my split going to be done and what is a deed number?
If you are checking on a parcel to see when your parcel will be split or combined, the deed number (which is in the upper right corner of a deed that has been recorded in the Recorder’s office) and/or parcel number will help speed up the process of the researching in order to get an answer.

How do I find my property in Apache County under GIS/Mapping?
Go to our Apache County Arizona main page. Under Departments go to GIS/Mapping, read the disclaimer and click on the acceptance line at the bottom. A map of the state of Arizona will come up. Go to the top of the tool bar and click on the first globe (five buttons that look the same) and type in the parcel number with the dashes (123-45-678) then hit find. It will take you to the location of your property (blue box). You can zoom in and out to determine the location of your property. On the left hand side will also be layers menu for searching for other items related to your parcel. (flood plain map, zoning, towns etc.)

Need signage on County Roads
Contact Engineering Department – Dale or Ruben 928-337-7528

What is a Special Flood Hazard Area (Flood Plain)?
A special flood hazard area is defined as an area having a 1 percent chance of being inundated by flood waters in any given year (thus the creation the term “100-year flood plain”).

What are the different Zones in a Flood Hazard Area, and What do they Mean?
Special Flood Hazard Areas – High Risk
Special Flood Hazard Areas represent the area subject to inundation by 1-percent-annual chance flood. Structures located within the SFHA have a 26-percent chance of flooding during the life of a standard 30-year mortgage. Federal floodplain management regulations and mandatory flood insurance purchase requirements apply in these zones.

ZONE
DESCRIPTION
A
Areas subject to inundation by the 1-percent-annual-chance flood event. Because detailed hydraulic analyses have not been performed, no Base Flood Elevations (BFEs) or flood depths are shown.
AE, A1-A30
Areas subject to inundation by the 1-percent-annual-chance flood event determined by detailed methods. BFEs are shown within these zones. (Zone AE is used on new and revised maps in place of Zones A1–A30.)
AH
Areas subject to inundation by 1-percent-annual-chance shallow flooding (usually areas of ponding) where average depths are 1–3 feet. BFEs derived from detailed hydraulic analyses are shown in this zone.
AO
Areas subject to inundation by 1-percent-annual-chance shallow flooding (usually sheet flow on sloping terrain) where average depths are 1–3 feet. Average flood depths derived from detailed hydraulic analyses are shown within this zone.
AR
Areas that result from the decertification of a previously accredited flood protection system that is determined to be in the process of being restored to provide base flood protection.
A99
Areas subject to inundation by the 1-percent-annual-chance flood event, but which will ultimately be protected upon completion of an under-construction Federal flood protection system. These are areas of special flood hazard where enough progress has been made on the construction of a protection system, such as dikes, dams, and levees, to consider it complete for insurance rating purposes. Zone A99 may be used only when the flood protection system has reached specified statutory progress toward completion. No BFEs or flood depths are shown.

Moderate and Minimal Risk Areas

Areas of moderate or minimal hazard are studied based upon the principal source of flood in the area. However, buildings in these zones could be flooded by severe, concentrated rainfall coupled with inadequate local drainage systems. Local stormwater drainage systems are not normally considered in a community’s flood insurance study. The failure of a local drainage system can create areas of high flood risk within these zones. Flood insurance is available in participating communities, but is not required by regulation in these zones. Nearly 25-percent of all flood claims filed are for structures located within these zones.

ZONE
DESCRIPTION

B, X (shaded)

Moderate risk areas within the 0.2-percent-annual-chance floodplain, areas of 1-percent-annual-chance flooding where average depths are less than 1 foot, areas of 1-percent-annual-chance flooding where the contributing drainage area is less than 1 square mile, and areas protected from the 1-percent-annual-chance flood by a levee. No BFEs or base flood depths are shown within these zones. (Zone X (shaded) is used on new and revised maps in place of Zone B.)
C, X (unshaded)
Minimal risk areas outside the 1-percent and .2-percent-annual-chance floodplains. No BFEs or base flood depths are shown within these zones. (Zone X (unshaded) is used on new and revised maps in place of Zone C.)

 

Undetermined Risk Areas

ZONE
DESCRIPTION
D
Unstudied areas where flood hazards are undetermined, but flooding is possible. No mandatory flood insurance purchase requirements apply, but coverage is available in participating communities.

What do I do if I find my property is covered by or has a Flood Plain on it?
Don’t panic. First and foremost, take time and review Apache County’s Floodplain Ordinance. This will give additional guidelines.

If you’ve come to the conclusion that your property is within the boundaries of a flood zone, the first step is to contact our office and verify whether your assumptions are correct. We should be able to confirm or deny whether this is an issue and if so – you will have to contact an insurance agent to know how much it will cost you to insure over it.

In most cases, the cost shouldn’t be too outlandish and luckily, most new home builders aren’t intentionally building properties within the boundaries of a high-risk flood zone (and if they are, they’re probably installing the proper foundation to deal with any potential flood hazards).

Can I build a home within the Flood Plain?
Please review Apache County’s Floodplain Ordinance.

All construction that is allowed in floodplain areas must have the lowest floor elevation at or above the 100-year floodplain elevation. If you have a multi-family or commercial project, you may build in the 100-year floodplain only if your lot complies with all floodplain standards. A FEMA Elevation Certificate is required.

What is an Elevation Certificate?
An Elevation Certificate is an important tool that documents your building’s elevation. If you live in a high-risk flood zone, you should provide an Elevation Certificate to your insurance agent to obtain flood insurance and ensure that your premium accurately reflects your risk. If your home or business is in a high-risk area, your insurance agent will need the Elevation Certificate (EC) to determine your flood insurance premium. … The higher your lowest floor is above the Base Flood Elevation (BFE), the lower the risk of flooding.

How do I find if I have Access to my Property?
We can help. Please provide us with a Property Tax Number or proof of ownership with an appropriate legal location, (TN., RG., Sec.). We will then be able to help locate the area in question.

What is a Public Easement or Right of Way?
A Public Easement is the right of the general public to use certain streets, highways or easements.

What is a Private Easement or Right of Way?
A private right of way is a right given to a particular individual or group of individuals to gain access over a piece of land or property. The underlying land remains private property.

Do you address on the Navajo Nation?
No we do not.  Please contact the Navajo Nation Division of General Services, P O Box 2928, Window Rock, AZ 86515  Phone : (928) 871-7744